Contact Information

  • Office of Government and Foundation Relations
    Siena Hall 219 · 2nd Floor
    Tel (518) 783-2307
    Fax (518) 786-5013

 

Past Grant Announcements

Spring 2013:

Siena College received two grants to support its Mt. McGregor College Initiative, which offers courses to inmates at the Mt. McGregor Correctional Facility.  The Raskob Foundation awarded a grant of $20,000 and an anonymous foundation awarded a grant of $40,000.  The funding will be used to purchase textbooks and supplies, reimburse instructors for mileage and pay instructors a modest honorarium for their efforts. 

 

Jodi O’Donnell, Ph.D., assistant professor of chemistry, and Lucas Tucker, Ph.D., assistant professor of chemistry, were awarded $75,000 from the Research Corporation for Science Advancement to study cholesteric liquid crystalline porphyrins and their efficacy as VOC sensors.  The combination of the liquid crystal’s responsiveness to external stimuli and the porphyrin’s ability to sense volatile organics should yield platforms for chemical sensing with the flexibility to modulate sensor response by numerous synthetic routes.

Stephen Deyrup, Ph.D., assistant professor of chemistry and biochemistry, was awarded $5,000 from the American Society of Pharmacognosy.  The grant will be used to purchase equipment to support his research on the elicitation of new antibiotics from fungi through biorational culturing.

Joshua Alexander, Ph.D., assistant professor of philosophy, was awarded $110,809 from the Fuller Theological Seminary through a grant program sponsored by the John Templeton Foundation.   The grant will support his research that explores the relationship between intellectual disagreement and the capacity to be open-minded, focusing on the role that specific cognitive dispositions, as well as specific contextual and situational factors, play in the capacity to be open-minded in the face of cognitive diversity.

Michael O’Brien, Lecturer in Chemistry, and Alicia Todaro, Lecturer in Chemistry, were awarded $49,973 through a NYS Department of Environmental Conservation grant from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.  This grant will advance green chemistry by focusing on toxic reductions in chemistry classrooms in NYS schools.  By employing more environmentally benign reagents and solvents, green chemistry is effective in reducing hazardous exposures affecting human health and hazardous waste disposal that might find its way into the environment

John Moustakas, Ph.D., assistant professor of physics, was awarded a $20,715 grant from the Space Telescope Science Institute to analyze Hubble Space Telescope observations to help ascertain how high-redshift galaxies assemble their stellar mass. 

Fall 2012:
 
John Moustakas, Ph.D., assistant professor of physics, was awarded a $15,390 grant from the Space Telescope Science Institute to analyze Hubble Space Telescope observations to help determine why galaxies stop forming new stars when they are gravitationally pulled into galaxy clusters. 
 
Adam Mason, Ph.D., assistant professor of biology, was awarded a $362,000 National Science Foundation research grant to study morphogenesis, a critical component of development by which embryonic structures are molded to generate the final adult forms. This work has the potential to contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms underlying birth defects and human disorders associated with defects in vesicular transport or sex determination.  The grant will provide funding for Mason, Stephanie Vernooy, Ph.D., visiting assistant professor of biology, and a team of undergraduate research students. 
                                      
Katherine Meierdiercks, Ph.D., assistant professor of environmental studies, was awarded a $1,400 grant to support a Siena student team to compete in the NYS Pollution Prevention Institute’s 2nd Annual Student Competition.
 
Brad Henry, Ph.D., assistant professor of mathematics and Jon Bannon, Ph.D., associate professor of mathematics, were awarded a $5,000 grant from the Educational Advancement Foundation to develop inquiry-based learning materials. These materials will help students develop research skills as they expand their understanding of knot theory.
 
Allan Weatherwax, Ph.D., professor of physics and dean of the school of science, was awarded a $564,805 grant for Major Research Instrumentation from the National Science Foundation.  In collaboration with colleagues at the University of Calgary and assistance from Siena undergraduate students, the Space Science Laboratory at Siena College will build the world’s foremost facility for imaging high-energy electron precipitation and remote sensing high-energy particle dynamics in near-Earth space.  This will involve the design, testing and building of a synchronous direct digital receiver that will form the foundation of the next-generation VLF-HF receivers/riometers.
 
Mathew Johnson ’93, Ph.D., associate professor of sociology and director of academic and community engagement (ACE), was awarded an additional $25,000 continuation grant from the Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS) to support Siena’s Volunteers in Service to America (VISTA) program. Funding will be used to support 34 VISTA placements across various not-for-profit agencies in partnership with ACE.  The total grant program managed by Siena College and financially supported and administered by CNCS totals $3,299,441.
 
Michele McColgan, Ph.D., assistant professor of physics,Robert Colesante, Ph. D., professor of education, and Don Biggs, Ph.D., visiting scholar of education, were awarded a $30,000 continuation grant from the Albany City School District to support Siena’s Urban Scholars program.  This program brings middle school students to Siena for enrichment experiences that promote their gifts and talents, operating on the premise that all youth possess or are capable of developing above-average abilities and high levels of motivation and creativity.
 
George Barnes, Ph.D., assistant professor of chemistry, was awarded an Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment computer time grant that is supported by the National Science Foundation. This non-monetary grant provided computational resources to perform modeling of chemical reactions.
 
Jennifer Dorsey, Ph.D., associate professor of history and director of the McCormick Center for the Study of the American Revolution, was awarded a $175,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. The grant supports the development of “Heaven on Earth: Shakers, Religious Revival and Social Reform in America,” a weeklong workshop that focuses on the history, contributions and legacies of American Shakers as a model for understanding the utopian impulse in American History.  Eighty K-12 teachers from around the country will attend the workshop on the Siena campus and at three landmark historic sites: Watervliet Shaker National Historic District (the original Shaker site in America), Shaker Museum Mount Lebanon and Hancock Shaker Village.   They will also explore the collection of Shaker documents housed at the New York State Library and view the comprehensive collection of Shaker artifacts held by the New York State Museum. 
 
Spring 2012:
 
Michele McColgan, Ph.D., assistant professor of physics,Robert Colesante, Ph. D., professor of education, and Don Biggs, Ph.D., visiting scholar of education, were awarded a $71,000 grant to partner with the Albany City School District on a NYS College Access Challenge Grant to increase the percentage of Hackett Middle School students who plan to pursue a college education.  Siena’s role in the multi-organization program will be to provide seminars that enable college and career exploration, as well as engage the students in science, technology and math projects designed to strengthen their motivation and performance in these areas.  Several of the seminars will include parent/family participation.
 
John Cummings, Ph.D., assistant professor of physics, was awarded a $243,689 grant from the National Science Foundation to continue his particle physics research that contributes to the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment, an international collaboration of physicists responsible for findings that could pave the way for explanations of why matter exists in the universe.  This program provides research opportunities for undergraduates and exposes them to exciting particle physics developments at the Brookhaven Laboratory and in China.
 
Allan Weatherwax, Ph.D., professor of physics and dean of the school of science, was awarded a $57,971 grant from the National Science Foundation to continue his atmospheric studies through the development and delivery of a suite of miniaturized detectors for optical, radio and energetic radiation measurements of lightning to the FireStation International Space Station.
 
Katherine Meierdiercks, Ph.D., assistant professor of environmental studies, was awarded a $9,521 grant from the New England Interstate Water Pollution Control Commission in partnership with New York State’s Department of Environmental Conservation’s Hudson River Estuary Program. This award enables the study of flooding and water quality issues in the Kromma Kill watershed.